Monday, October 10, 2011

Thing 7 - Digital Citizenship

The first hoax site I examined was
http://www.dhmo.org/ about dihydrogen monoxide being a dangerous chemical that should be banned.

         Credibility 
      The author is Tom Way – Script coordinator, researcher and production assistant in Hollywood. The registrar of the site is GoDaddy.

 Accuracy
Dihydrogen Monoxide is Water! 2 Hydrogens, One Oxygen=H2O=Water! Simple research or knowledge is needed to realize this is a hoax.
          Reliability

The website seems to have an obvious slant toward making money with all of the commercial space given. Serious research sites would not have something so blatantly commercial. 
Relevance
This site has no relevance to anything, unless a person were researching a hoax.
Date
This site claims to updated as of today, but when I changed the date in the settings of my computer, then refreshed the site, it showed the new date as the “last updated” date.
Sources
There are absolutely no sources for the information listed. There are links to real organizations like the Center for Disease Control and the Environmental Protection Agency to perhaps try to lend credibility. There is a place where the DHMO quotes an email from the EPA which insinuates that the EPA is trying to cover up the harmful effects of dihydrogen monoxide, but when you know the truth, the EPA is really trying to get the DHMO to stop the hoax so that “innocent” (ignorant?) people don’t fall for it.
Scope/Purpose 
The purpose seems to be to trick ignorant people into writing congressmen and looking foolish and/or to make money from the same people if they buy a product the site is selling. This little image should tell you that the author is not a scientific minded person, but a person with whom P.T. Barnum (there’s a sucker born every minute) would find kinship.
Serious science or serious charlatan?


There is no sneak preview to see what the lessons might look like


     The second web site I did was http://city-mankato.us/ which tells that because of certain geothermal  conditions, Mankato, MN is a tropical paradise.

Credibility

This is actually put out by a professor intending to show his students that you can’t believe everything you read on the internet. A fictional Internet Web site that describes Mankato, Minn., as a tropical paradise was featured last week in a New York Times story about why information on the Net can't always be trusted.

Accuracy

Not at all, but obviously so (at least to most people)

Reliability

Reliably hilarious, all the way to the disclaimer at the end! Check out the heading: ATTENTION: This site has been hijacked by Sheikh Yarbouti. We are trying to resecure it. Because of this the proper Web address may not appear in your browser address window above.
The City-Mankato.US Website is published using 100% recycled electrons (at least 27% post-consumer). Please Recycle When Finished.
Relevance

The creator of this site, Dan Descy says that "It was designed for a class to show that you can't believe everything you see on the Net", proving that CARRDSS is necessary!

Date

Updated: The First Monday of Each Month (insert tongue firmly in cheek)



 


Sources

None, but to most educated people, there is enough humor on the site to be sure that it is satire.

Scope/Purpose 

College professor making a point to students that just because it’s on the web does not automatically make it reliable.

 

Posting Personal Information and Netiquette

1. I will use the core rules of netiquette to have my students go through, one of the ten topics per week. I'll have them blog or do a "Todays Meet" backchannel conversation to share their response to the rule of the week. http://www.albion.com/netiquette/corerules.html


2. I will use little video clips from NetSmartz workshop to highlight the need to be careful about what personal information you make available and what should or should not be posted on the web. http://www.netsmartz.org/Educators

video

 

No comments:

Post a Comment